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Where do Physical Servers Fit into a Cloud Dominated World?

The Cloud, the difference between in-house servers and a group of IT experts working on your server virtually. In the last few years, many people and businesses have adopted this new way of doing things, through the Cloud. In-house servers are quickly becoming a thing of the past- leaving those who haven’t made the switch questioning their lack of action. With the different experiences, these two servers provide, deciding whether to make the switch or not can be difficult.

The Cloud, the difference between in-house servers and a group of IT experts working on your server virtually. In the last few years, many people and businesses have adopted this new way of doing things, through the Cloud. In-house servers are quickly becoming a thing of the past- leaving those who haven’t made the switch questioning their lack of action. With the different experiences, these two servers provide, deciding whether to make the switch or not can be difficult.

Uptime

It is important that you have a reliable server for your business to ensure the highest levels of productivity. Thinking about how to keep your business up and running is usually at the forefront of the company’s to-do list, but not in a way that you might initially think. When deciding on an online or physical server it is important to know what you want for your company. Since the Cloud is virtualized, it provides backup and recovery options in the case of a disaster. The process of backing up and storing data is managed by an IT service provider, so you don’t have to worry about it. With a physical server, an accident could mean your business is down until an IT service provider is able to make it to the location of the server and service it. With Cloud services like Microsoft Azure, there is a 99.95% guarantee that the server will be operational due to the level of commitment those running the virtual server have. If one Cloud server goes down, another will take its place to keep your information available. What isn’t covered by that 99.95% is time spent installing updates, as any server will need eventually.

Costs

The initial cost of setting up an online or a physical server vary greatly. When first setting up a physical server expenses include things such as hardware, facilities, and human support. You must first purchase all the required items such as a motherboard, processor, hard drive and of course the power supply. Not to mention the cost of keeping the environment the server is in, in a suitable manner. These expenses can add up quickly, meaning that the initial cost of setting up a physical server can be around $10,000. This doesn’t even include the recurring cost of either in-house or out of house IT support.

With the Cloud, initial costs are not as high. In fact, there is about a 70% decrease in costs when comparing physical and virtual servers initially. Costs of the Cloud come later, rather than being apparent as soon as the servers are set up. These costs include Cloud services, moving data onto the Cloud, often due to network bandwidth, and long-term data storage. The Cloud also gives you the ability to determine what your costs are, and if it would be more economical to switch to an in-house method of doing things rather than outsourcing with the Cloud.

Flexibility

With a physical server, your business is tied to the location of the server. This might mean that you can only do work in the building where the server is, or only on certain devices. Being tied to one location can be a problem for companies, especially when they might require work to be done in various locations rather than one set building. With the Cloud, this is not an issue. So long as you have internet access you can work from any location or device. The Cloud works through the internet, and when you implement the Cloud you are renting virtual server space rather than a physical computer. This helps not only with productivity but with the stresses and headaches that come with the inability to get things done outside of the office. With the Cloud anyone can work from anywhere, meaning that even though you had to stay home with your sick cat, you can still be a productive asset to the business. This also allows companies to implement BYOD (bring your own device) policies as well, which can help with productivity, moral and even convenience.

Security and Risk

Security is always a concern when a business has large amounts of private information. This might mean records or files that contain personal information like phone numbers or other documents that you don’t want to fall into the wrong hands. Security of your server depends largely on configuration, staff knowledge and the environment that your server is located in. If all of your company’s sensitive information is kept secure by a single physical server, the moment something happens to that server you are lost. With a physical server, you must then rely on IT support to try and fix the issue to get you back on track. This is not the case with a virtual server such as the Cloud. By switching to the Cloud, you stand to gain a decrease in risk mitigation. Online servers keep your files safe, as well as providing your company with a knowledgeable staff who can fix whatever issues you may run into.

Physical and virtual servers are both places where you can store your data, but the benefits of virtual servers outweigh those of physical servers. They provide different levels of service, with the Cloud being as capable as in-house servers on all fronts. With so many business functions being hosted in the Cloud, you may find yourself asking ‘do I really need a physical server in my office?’

To begin transitioning from in-house servers to the Cloud, contact the Cloud Service Experts at Phoenix Technology Inc. by calling (360) 433-6930 or emailing info@phoenixtechnologyit.com